Wednesday, January 24, 2018

I'm Writing A Book About The Birth Of The American Ska Scene!

Hello! I want to wish any of the readers of this blog a belated Happy New Year!  While I have neglected to post here regularly, its because I've signed a deal with DiWulf Publishing to write an oral history about the birth and origins of the American ska scene and its place in American sub-culture!

The initial purpose of this blog was to collect stories and research the histories of well-known and overlooked American ska bands who helped lay the foundation for the explosion of the genre in the early 90's and its ongoing popularity. My as-yet-untitled book will be told through the recollections and anecdotes of the people who lived it: the musicians who were heavily influenced by 2-Tone bands from the UK, the clubs and booking agents who supported the scene from its infancy, the bands that made music and toured relentlessly, and the fans who fell in love with the American counterpart of a beloved British subculture.

Right now I'm in the earliest stages of gathering material and research. My publisher is looking towards the end of 2018 as a tentative release date. I am already hard at work interviewing a who's who of American ska and reggae musicians, DJs, club promoters, artists and fans who helped develop ska scenes across the U.S. and supported its growth.  I'm hoping to create the most comprehensive look at the birth of American ska.

Over the next year, I'll post updates on the research process, who I'm interviewing and my overall progress. 

Thanks again to the many readers who continue to visit the site.  I'm writing this book for anyone who loves ska as much as I do!

1 comment:

eric said...

I can't wait for this book. I was in high school in the early 90s and hypnotized by the very late hangover of 2 tone -- Skank Records, the Busters, the Braces, etc, and the US stuff that became early 3rd wave, the Toasters, LGB, the Skaface comp, etc.

I ended up playing in ska bands throughout the 90s, Greenhouse, Isaac Green & the Skalars, and the Eclectics, and have played in bands ever since, a Japanese band called nanoX who still play in Tokyo, and now Julian Leal Band back in Chicago.

That early 90s pre-internet international ska scene was the most exciting thing I could have found at the time and I'm still very appreciative of it and the friends I made through it.

I'm consistently blown away by the specificity of books available now, from Andrew Mattheson's Hollywood Brats book to Nick Welsh's "Life and Times of a Ska Man" book. I can tell from this blog you'll do an excellent job of putting your book together and while it's unlikely to crack a serious bestseller list I am really excited for it and will greatly enjoying reading it.